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Photo#43967
Here is another Conopid - Physocephala sagittaria - female

Here is another Conopid - Physocephala sagittaria - Female
Vero Beach, Indian River County, Florida, USA
March 2, 2006

Images of this individual: tag all
Here is another Conopid - Physocephala sagittaria - female Here is another Conopid - Physocephala sagittaria - female

Moved

Moved tentatively...
...based on Joel's comment at

Moved from Physocephala.

 
=v=...this turns out to be P. sagittaria
This is the "texana look-alike" form of P. sagittaria. It's often mistaken for P. texana, but the dark discal cell; dark facial grooves; black (rather than reddish-brown) "T" on frons; and the Florida locale all indicate P. sagittaria...and exclude texana.

More details, with links to supporting references, can be found within my comment for the post below:




I believe the "ferruginous" (=red) form of P. sagittaria in this post corresponds to what Loew called Conops castanopterus, now a synonym of P. sagittaria. Williston's 1882 translation of Loew, as well as his description of P. sagittaria and its dark form (Loew's P. genualis) can be read online here.

Physocephala sp.
Hello Sean,
Yes, a conopid allright, and a species in the genus Physocephala. Characteristic in this picture are: no ocelli, and the basal thickening of the hind femur. The other picture also shows the wing venation, which is also important. In the nearctic there are about 7 species in this genus.
Greetings,
Gerard Pennards

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